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PUBLICATION, JANUARY, 2014. The Bioscientist. Vol. 2

The Bioscientist Vol. 2 (1): 17-29, January 2014.
Available online at http://www.bioscientistjournal.com
Iwueze et al., 2014. Page 17

PREVALENCE, INTENSITY AND CLINICAL PROFILE OF MALARIA AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTENATAL CLINICS IN ONITSHA-NORTH LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA, ANAMBRA STATE, SOUTHERN NIGERIA.
Iwueze, M.O., Okwusogu, M.I., Onyido, A.E., Okafor, F.C. Nwaorgu, O.C. and Ukibe, S.N.
1Dept. of Parasitology and Entomology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria.
2Dept. of Zoology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria.
3Dept. of Prosthesis and Orthosis. Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria.

*Corresponding author email: mirobiukwu@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT (Download PDF )


A study to determine the prevalence, intensity and clinical profile of pregnant women
attending antenatal clinics in Onitsha-North Local Government Area, Anambra State
Nigeria was carried out in four hospitals between May and September, 2013. A total of
200 blood samples were collected from systematically selected pregnant women. Malaria
parasites were examined microscopically on thick and thin blood smear stained with
Giemsa stain from each. Personal data were collected both orally and from maternity
records of the women, analyzed using chi-square test. The results showed that of 200
pregnant women sampled in the study 116(58.0%) were positive for malaria parasites.
Two Plasmodia species were encountered: Plasmodium falciparum (53.0%) and P. vivax
(5.0%). The highest prevalence and intensity of malaria parasites (19.5% and 11.5%
respectively) were found in those aged 21-25 years while the lowest prevalence and
intensity (7.5% and 2.0% respectively) occurred in those aged 41 years and above. The
highest prevalence (26.0%) of malaria were observed among those in primigravidae but
least in those in multigravidae (12.5%).Mild infection was observed highest among those
in primigravidae (16.5%) but least (8.0%) among those in multigravidae. Moderate
infection followed the same trend, being highest (9.0%) in primigravidae and least in
multigravidae (4.5%). Women in their first trimester were more infected (21.0%) than
those in second trimester (19.0%) and third trimester (18.0%). The study demonstrated a
high prevalence of malaria in the population evaluated, therefore it is important to
develop coherent and effective policies and tools to tackle malaria and poverty.

Keywords: prevalence, intensity, clinical, profile, malaria, pregnant women, antenatal,
clinics, Onitsha North,


© 2013. Journal of Faculty of Biosciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University,

P. M. B. 5025 Awka, Nigeria.

email: thebioscientist@unizik.edu.ng

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