ASSESSMENT OF MALARIA PARASITEMIA AND GENOTYPE RELATIONSHIP OF PATIENTS ATTENDING TERTIARY HEALTH CARE CENTRE IN KATSINA STATE, NIGERIA

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Z. Habiba
K. Abdullahi
A. Aminu

Abstract

Malaria parasitemia and genotype of patients attending Tertiary Medical Center, in Katsina State was assessed. A total of 400 samples were collected from consented patients through venipuncture techniques. The blood samples were processed within 3 to 6 hours of collection.  Using blood samples Infection status and genotype were screened using standard techniques. Their demographic characteristics were determined using questionnaires. Chi-square test was used to determine the degree of relationship between malarial parasite infection and genotype. Out of 400 consented patients examined, 193 patients (48.3%) were affected by malaria at varying degree of parasitemia. According to the gender, the prevalence of malaria was found to be (48.3%) among female respondents compared to their male counterparts with 48.1%(P>0.05). The results further showed that the subjects with normal genotypes are significantly more infected compared to those with S- gene. The occurrence of malarial infection among the participants with normal (AA) genotype is comparatively higher (53.8%) compared to the carrier (AS) participants with 41.7% and those with sickle cell disease (SS) having the least with 33.3%. Conclusively people with AS and SS genotype have more genetic advantage toward resistance to Malarial parasite infection. However, more scientific reasons require further elucidation.

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How to Cite
Habiba, Z., Abdullahi, K., & Aminu, A. (2022). ASSESSMENT OF MALARIA PARASITEMIA AND GENOTYPE RELATIONSHIP OF PATIENTS ATTENDING TERTIARY HEALTH CARE CENTRE IN KATSINA STATE, NIGERIA. The Bioscientist Journal, 10(3), 348-356. Retrieved from https://bioscientistjournal.com/index.php/The_Bioscientist/article/view/130
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